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1998 – Matthew Shepard – Memorial and Protest

Matthew Shepard expressions of sympathy at 18th and Castro.

Matthew Shepard expressions of sympathy at 18th and Castro.

Matthew Shepard was brutally attacked on Oct 6, 1998 and he died on Oct 12, 1998 from the deadly injuries inflicted upon him.  The Castro was in a state of shock, there was a street protest, a candlelight vigil and community expressions of sympathy and outrage on the corner of 18th and Castro.  These photos reflect the hurt everyone felt by this hateful act.

1970 – G. Mark Mulleian’s Crucifixion

Crucifixion2

Mark Mulleian’s
Homoerotic Crucifixion has been stolen.

I first met Mark Mulleian in 1970 while living in the Morning Glory Commune in The Haight Asbury. We were all fascinated with Mark’s Crucifixion painting. Ron Raz an up and coming New York was the model. I published my memoirs in 2012, and reconnected with Mark again after nearly 45 years, here’s the excerpt from, “San Francisco’s Sissy Native Son.” by Ron Williams.

“Upon the gallery wall was an enormous canvass eleven by seven feet:  “The Crucifixion,” a work in progress. It lay upon scaffolding for the artist and at 90 degrees on the opposing wall, a life size wooden cross for the model, Ron Raz himself, to hang upon (un-nailed) during the hours he modeled for the Crucifixion. We found it a revolutionary work of art as well as a controversial painting. Mark beautifully enhanced the Crucifixion with the chiseled muscular features that he transposed from Ron Raz’s masculine body onto the canvass. From my perspective it was an erotic Jesus with, perfect biceps, muscles and to-die-for and perfect abs. Even the naked feet depicted with nails driven directly through the ankles into the cross were fascinating and aesthetically arousing. 

We all knew it would be controversial to publish a spread about the artist and the “The Crucifixion,” but we couldn’t pass it up; it seemed out of the context of what we were doing with the “Organic Morning Glory.”  But then so was Mark Mulleian, who was a Vietnam veteran and a bitter one at that. He had been angered by U.S. policies in Vietnam War and nearly court-martialed for carrying dismantled rusted parts of his rifle in a gunnysack to protest the war.”

Today the whereabouts of Mark Mulleian’s  Crucifixion painting is unknown, it disappeared from Mark’s storage locker, several years ago.

http://www.mulleian.com/biography.htm

Paul Deegan writes about Mark Mulleian.

 

www.mulleian.com